SAMPLE OUTLINE 7

 

Framework  Headings Description Sources
Introduction Definition 1)      Political financing includes financial resources raised and spent by parties in the process of political competition. This core concept develops in different directions, depending on the political system of the country.

2)      Money politics not only a campaign expenses but also the costs of maintaining permanent offices and foundations, carrying out policy research, publicity and lobbying, and other expenses and channels of political financing.

 

Money in Politics: Sound Political Competition and Trust in Government, Mr Bruno Wilhelm Speck, 2013
what is the issue Political funding has an effect on the government and policy making decisions Does Money Buy Votes? , Adam R. Brown, 2012

 

Details of your topic 1) The power of money in politics to ensure good governance

2) Evaluate the causes

3) Importance of money in politics

4) Importance to find ways to control negative impact of political funding

Does Money Buy Votes? , Adam R. Brown, 2012

Managing the Risk of Corporate Political Donations: A Utilitarian Perspective, S. Leong, J. Hazelton, C. Townley, 2012

Thesis Statement This paper will be comparing the political funding system in two countries which is the United States and Malaysia and will discuss the integrity impact on who the money is raised for, who the money is raised from and the political decision making.  
Body Argument 1  If a political finance system fails to provide sufficient operating

funds to parties, moral and practical risks eventuate

 Managing the Risk of Corporate Political Donations: A Utilitarian Perspective, S. Leong, J. Hazelton, C. Townley, 2012
Argument 2 The influence of wealthy special interest group or corporate groups is an attempt of “buying elections”and “drowning the people’s” voice

–          (SP) “Pre-election influence” is a group that concerned in political campaign after policies are set and contributions are used to better inform voters of the candidate’s platforms.

–          (SP) “Post-election influence”  is a group that have interest and concerned with lobbying which possess better information than a policy maker about some policy-relevant state variable.

 

Populism, Partisanship and the Funding of Political Campaigns, Tilman Klumpp, 2011
Argument 3 A donation restriction might seem likely to reduce the risk of inappropriate influence because this would lessen the inequity between corporate and citizen power.

–       (SP) Some scholars said that there is no effect of laws that restricted or loosened corporate giving on the share values of corporate donors.

 

 

Managing the Risk of Corporate Political Donations: A Utilitarian Perspective, S. Leong, J. Hazelton, C. Townley, 2012
Counter Argument 1 – 3 1)      Law relating to party funding and campaign financing can only reduce risks but a clean government depends on individual integrity

2)      The attempt of buying election from the wealthy individual or organization tend to give high influence on the election.

 

 
Conclusion Summarize points As a conclusion, we can conclude that there are possibility that money can buy the results of an election but to find the prove of the involvement of certain individual is hard and impossible.  

 

SAMPLE OUTLINE 6

 

  1. TITLE

The effect of Bauxite Mining and How To Overcome The Issue

  1. INTRODUCTION

2.1 Definition of bauxite

  1. Bauxite ore is the world’s primary source of aluminum. Bauxite is a rock formed from a reddish clay material called laterite soil and is most commonly found in tropical or subtropical regions. (The Aluminum Association,2016)
  2. Bauxite is not a mineral. It is a rock formed from a laterite soil that has been severely leached of silica and other soluble materials in a wet tropical or subtropical climate. It is the primary ore of aluminum. Almost all of the aluminum that has ever been produced has been extracted from bauxite. (Hobart King, 2010)

2.2 Background information

  1. Bauxite mining leaves long term negative impact on the environment. The bauxite mining activity is responsible for alteration in the basic physicochemical properties and composition of the local micro and macro ecosystems, which is bound to have adverse environmental impact on biodiversity, soils and hydrology.( Lad R.J. and Samant J.S., 2015).
  2. The economy, environmental and social impact of quarrying and mining activities may be felt both on and off to a longer period. The impacts are physical, affecting land, water, air, wildlife and vegetation and economic, affecting the supply and demand, revenues,employment and so on. There are also health and safety implications for both individuals and communities.
  • Mining and Quarrying Safety and Health Act 1999 (2012) stated that quarry is a place on land where operations are carried on, continuously or from time to time, to produce construction or road building material.
  • In Malaysia, The bauxite output in H2 may see a decline of around 40% compared with that in H1. In accordance with the latest regulations in Malaysia, mines which haven’t obtained mining permits before 31 August will be shut down. The output of bauxite is expected to see a reduction of at least 40% if harsh measures are taken to ensure the enforcement of this policy. (Malaysia Golden Prosperous Resources, 2015)

2.3 Thesis statement

  1. This paper focus on the effect of bauxite mining from various perspectives and how to overcome the issue. The bauxite mining affected different perspectives in our lives and this paper will covered on economic, social and environmental perspectives. The ways to overcome the issue will be explained through these three perspectives also

3.1 The Effects of Bauxite Mining
3.1.1 Economic Perspective

  • Bauxite mining in some areas of the country (Malaysia) affect the country’s tourism sector and also the impact of that activity has reduced 20 per cent of tourists to the hotel and resort near mining sites, especially in the last six months of last year.(Sinar Harian, 2 Feb 2016).
  • This situation has certainly affected the livelihoods of fishermen in the affected areas because fish contaminated with chemicals from bauxite mining.
  • Recovery process resulting from bauxite mining activity involves very high costs and also time consuming.
  • Farmers also suffered the effects of bauxite mining because the soils damaged by toxic contained in bauxite. Infertility and damaged plants cause farmers suffer losses on their plantation.

Stance: We agree that bauxite mining cost economic perspective.

3.1.2 Social Perspective

  • Digging bauxite in some area in Malaysia is a serious matter of concern to the people because their agricultural land being invaded
  • The uncontrolled bauxite mining has disrupted the daily routine of locals in term of logistics route for residents of the city
  • The areas have experienced large number of truck accidents, even fatal causing serious discontent and agitations among the locals.
  • The process of carry out the bauxite has caused main roads dirty and the bauxite lorry is dangerous to the public where there are cases on accident and also fatalities (Berita Awani, 5 Jul 2016)
  • The employment potential of the mining was much less than claimed and very few locals are actually benefited.
  • Most of the plots were quite small, allowing the companies to exploit a loophole in Malaysian law, which only requires an environmental impact assessment for plots larger than 250 hectares. (BBC News, 19 Jan 2016)

Stance: We agree that bauxite mining cost social perspective.

3.1.3 Environmental Perspective

  • Bauxite also creates environmental problems and pollution that damage the entire ecology system, change the socio-economic structure and can be lethal to human lives of the region
  • Air Pollution- Dust is a primarily environmental problem caused by Bauxite mining. Dust absolutely covers very large surrounding areas that affect the habitats, including residential and agricultural neighborhoods of the Bauxite exploitation site. This phenomenon is very harmful to the growth of the agricultural products and reduces the productivity of these trees.
  • Water Pollution- Bauxite is a low-level naturally occurring radioactive material. It contains small quantities of uranium (238U), thorium (232Th), and potassium (40K).7 The low-level natural radioactivity present in the ore transfers almost entirely to the solid residue stream during refining—some to sand residue but most to mud residue. (Donoghue, A. M., Frisch, N., & Olney, D. (n.d.). Bauxite Mining and Alumina Refining: Process Description and Occupational Health Risks, 8 May 2014)
  • The data shows that when the toxic red sludge is dumped on the ground, its toxic chemicals will be percolated to the underground water table along with rainwater, which would then contaminate the main water source of the highlands region.
  • The Pahang Fisheries Department had issued a warning against the consumption of seafood caught in the waters off Kuantan on Dec 30 after the sea turned red from bauxite run-off. (Malay Mail,14 April 2016)
  • Damage the Ecosystem- First thing that happens in the mining process in order to access the bauxite is the complete destruction of vast areas of forests with bulldozers and giant chains.
  • Marine scientists have also warned of possible catastrophic damage to the ecosystem off the coast of Pahang. (BBC News, 19 Jan 2016)
  • Aside from the killing of native plants, this also wipes out habitat for important wildlife

Stance: We agree that bauxite mining cost environmental perspective.

3.2 The Ways to Overcome

3.2.1 Economy Perspective

  1. Strict supervision in issuing/revoking mining licence
  • The issuing of mining licence should demanding the rules concerning the strict obedience to the government without any personal freedom
  • Since illegal mining operations are carried out without state permission, they do not comply with labor or environmental regulations or pay taxes so the licensing and regulatory bodies should normalized the process and requirement of giving licenses and mining permits to the people
  • Revoke the licence of mines which lacked the mandatory operation standards and restoration efforts and have failed to ensure proper mining on scientific basis

3.2.2  Social Perspective

  1. Careful monitoring and guideline
  • Government need to set a guideline for miners and companies that involves in the mining industry. There is need for monitoring the activities conducted to curb illegal mining.
  • Better regulations and better enforcement of existing regulations are keys to improving environmental performance in mining. (Saskatchewan Eco Network)
  • A campaigned or courses  need to be conduct for mines in order to exposed about the negative impact on illegal mining and shows the guideline that must be follow before obtaining the mining licence.

3.2.3  Environmental Perspective

  1. Safeguard the purity and quantity of our water
  • Identify some places where mining should not be allowed to proceed because the identified risks to other resources, such as water, are too great.
  • Use better Tailings ponds (finely ground rock and mineral waste products from mineral processing operations) in order to prevent the direct discharge of mine water into surface waters. There are a number of cases in drier climates where no water is directly discharged from tailings ponds because evaporation is the major water removal process.

3.3  Agreement To  All Perspectives Mentioned

We agree that bauxite mining cost effect from various perspectives such as economic, social and environmental. Such irresponsible practices has caused adverse effects to the people who live near the mining sites, environment too. The ways suggested should be took into action to overcome this issue.

CONCLUSION

The environmental and humanitarian concerns due to bauxite exploitation resulting from hazardous waste are simply too risky and they will severely impact the entire region. Bauxite mining being a temporary economic activity leaves long term socioeconomic and environmental footprints. Therefore attempts to be made to overcome this issue at any measure is mandatory.

 

 

 

 

 

SAMPLE OUTLINE 5

Rehabilitation and reintegration of offenders in Society.

Framework Heading DESCRIPTION Source
Introduction Definition We define reintegration as the process of transitioning from incarceration to the community, adjusting to life outside of prison or jail, and attempting to maintain a crime-free lifestyle.

Reintegration is a complex process that occurs over time and there is much we do not know about the process.

 

(Laub and Sampson, 2001, 2003) in (D, Celeste, B, Stephen and W, Carol 2012)

(Healy and O’Donnell, 2008) in (D, Celeste, B, Stephen and W, Carol 2012)

What is the problem? Reintegration of ex-prisoners is currently one of the major issues in the correctional services field, and promoting successful reintegration is an ongoing concern in efforts to reduce recidivism.

 

There has been a significant increase in the prison population over the past 10 years that has participated a flood of prisoners returning to the community.

The problem is that ex-prisoners are not provided with what they need to be successfully integrated in the society. They need better healthcare, financial stability, and social and formal support

so what is the problem? identify the prob that leads to have an interest in this topic

(Shinkfield J and Graffam J, 2007)
Details of the issue Reintegration into the community is multifaceted, and typically, ex-prisoners experience wide-ranging challenges to reintegration. Variables influencing reintegration may be conceptualized as falling within three domains

 

1.       Interpersonal conditions (including physical and psychological health).

2.       Subsistence conditions (including finance, employment and housing).

3.       Support conditions (including social support, formal support services and criminal justice support).

(Shinkfield J and Graffam J, 2007)

(D, Celeste, B, Stephen and W, Carol 2012)

(Prison Reform Trust, 2007).

 

 

Thesis Statement In this paper we will be looking into the issues, challenges or the obstacles faced by offenders and ex-prisoners during the process of reintegrating them in the community and we will be looking into ways to solves or reduce the effects of those challenges.  
Body Problem 1 (Health prospective)

The literature on the intrapersonal conditions of prisoners and ex-prisoners indicates that this group is characterized by physical health problems

and psychological health problems (Health prospective)

(Deloitte Consulting, 2003; National Commission on

Correctional Health Care, 2002) in (Shinkfield J and Graffam J, 2007).

Solution 1 The scientific ‘treatment’ of offenders was justified by reference to the common good, but also by the emerging social work profession’s commitment to individual needs (Peter Raynor, 2009)
Problem 2 (Financial stability perspective after release from prison)

In addition to intrapersonal conditions, numerous subsistence variables affect ex-prisoners. They typically have limited financial resources at their disposal, and they often carry the financial burden of debt . Employment is clearly critical to alleviating the financial pressure typically experienced by ex-prisoners.(which perspective will u cover)

(La Vigne, Visher, & Castro, 2004) in (Shinkfield J and Graffam J, 2007)

(Stringer, 2002) in (Shinkfield J and Graffam J, 2007).

Solution 2 Receiving some level of financial support from family members in early post-release period. This may well have contributed to reducing the impact that lack of money can have on procuring housing, employment, health care, and drug and alcohol treatment, as well as positively affecting family relationships. (Shinkfield J and Graffam J, 2007).
Problem 3 (Social and formal support perspective)

However, many ex-offenders have to live with the stigma of having served time behind bars. The suspicion and prejudice that ex-offenders face after release can often be more punishing than the prison sentence itself, with many finding themselves stepping into a ‘second prison’ of invisible bars.(Social and formal support perspective )

(Stanley Tang, 2007)
Solution 3 Changing the conventional mindset by television advertisements, with bold and innovative messaging, to place greater commitment and emphasis on rehabilitation to enable offenders to renew and restart their lives. (Stanley Tang, 2007)
Conclusion We have examined three issues faced by ex-prisoners willing to re-enter the community. In this paper we also look into ways to solve the issues mentioned earlier.

 

SAMPLE OUTLINE 4

 

OUTLINE SAMPLE 1 FOR TERM PAPER

Framework Headings Description Sources
Introduction Definition Nowadays medical field is one of the most important aspect in daily life.Many technologies has been implemented in the medical field and it give effects to human and also environment.

Augmented Reality (AR) as a real-time direct or indirect view of a physical real world environment that has been enhanced / augmented by adding virtual computer generated

information to it.

1 .Augmented reality technologies, systems and applications (Julie Carmigniani et. al,2010)

2. 3D printing based on imaging data: review of medical applications (F.Rengier et al,2010)

3. Ethical Perceptions with Regard to Pre-Implantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) from the Perspective of Selected Medical Professionals in Malaysia (A. P. Olesen et. al, 2016)

What is the issue? The contributions of technology to the medical worlds and its drawbacks. 1. 3D printing based on imaging data: review of medical applications (F.Rengier et al,2010)

2. Danger to public health: Medical devices, toxicity, virus and fraud (S. Kierkegaard, P. Kierkegaard, 2013)

Details of your topic The effects of various technologies in medical field.

Able to find more cure.

Develop surgical/medical techniques.

Improve life for human being.

Generate more income for people.

1. 3D printing based on imaging data: review of medical applications (F.Rengier et al,2010)
2. Augmented reality technologies, systems and applications (Julie Carmigniani et. al,2010)
Thesis statement This paper evaluates the use of technology in the medical field and how technology developers are coming about it ethically. 1 .Augmented reality technologies, systems and applications (Julie Carmigniani et. al,2010)

2. 3D printing based on imaging data: review of medical applications (F.Rengier et al,2010)

3. Ethical Perceptions with Regard to Pre-Implantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) from the Perspective of Selected Medical Professionals in Malaysia (A. P. Olesen et. al, 2016)

Body Argument 1 The acknowledgement of new technological discovery in medical field retrospective to previous surgical techniques.

The use of latest in technology.

Potential future medical.

 

 

1 .Augmented reality technologies, systems and applications (Julie Carmigniani et. al,2010)

2. 3D printing based on imaging data: review of medical applications (F.Rengier et al,2010)

3. Ethical Perceptions with Regard to Pre-Implantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) from the Perspective of Selected Medical Professionals in Malaysia (A. P. Olesen et. al, 2016)

Counter Argument 1 Development of application that based on augmented reality.

The new surgery technique, that use the 3D printing.

 

1. Augmented reality technologies, systems and applications (Julie Carmigniani et. al,2010)

2. 3D printing based on imaging data: review of medical applications (F.Rengier et al,2010)

Argument 2 Is the development of technology in the medical field is too good to be true? 3D printing based on imaging data: review of medical applications (F.Rengier et al,2010)
Counter Argument 2 Recent findings on the failure and fraud medical devices.

Impact on health and company.

1. 3D printing based on imaging data: review of medical applications (F.Rengier et al,2010)

2. Danger to public health: Medical devices, toxicity, virus and fraud (S. Kierkegaard, P. Kierkegaard, 2013)

Argument 3 How health professionals are taking this issue responsibly?

Health professionals have begun using social media to benefit patients

 

1. Dangers and opportunities for social media in medicine (Dr. Daniel R. George et. al,2013)

2. Danger to public health: Medical devices, toxicity, virus and fraud (S. Kierkegaard, P. Kierkegaard, 2013)

Counter Argument 3 Discussion of the dangers of these technologies in medicine has overwhelmed

consideration of positive applications.

1. Ethical Perceptions with Regard to Pre-Implantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) from the Perspective of Selected Medical Professionals in Malaysia (A. P. Olesen et. al, 2016)
2. Dangers and opportunities for social media in medicine (Dr. Daniel R. George et. al,2013)
Conclusion   The world had witnessed the effect of the implementation of the various technologies in the medical field such as Augmented reality technology, 3D printing technology and the media social.

Existence of technology in the medical world faced many challenges and creates hope for future medicines.

1. Dangers and opportunities for social media in medicine (Dr. Daniel R. George et. al,2013)

 

 

 

SAMPLE OUTLINE 3

SAMPLE OUTLINE 3: REDUCING ACADEMIC PROCRASTINATION AMONG STUDENTS

  1. INTRODUCTION
  2. Definition
  3. Steel’s (2007) definition of (academic) procrastination is “to voluntarily delay an intended course of action despite expecting to be worse off for the delay” (as cited in Grunschel, Patrzek & Fries, 2013, p841)
  4. “Procrastination is the failure to take action, to make something happen” (Lively,1999 ,p7).
  • “A lack of self-discipline” (Johnson & Bloom, 1994, p131)

 

  1. b) Descriptions on procrastinators
  2. Using a model profile analysis of a variety of measures from both university students and nonstudents, Lay (1987), identifies four different groups of procrastinators. The groups shared some characteristics (such as disorganization), but each also has some relatively distinctive characteristics.
  3. One “self-engaged but independent” group was high on private self-consciousness and low in concern for what others thought” (Day, Mensink, O’Sullivan, 2000, p122)
  • About 50% of students listed themselves as procrastinators, and about half of the time or more they procrastinate on academic tasks.” (Ferrari, Johnson & McCown, 1995,p13)

 

  1. Causes
  2. Grunschel, Patrzek & Fries (2013): There are more internal reasons (eight main categories) than external reasons (three main categories) for academic procrastination.
  3. “Students with high amotivation who had no sense of control over their learning processes reported high procrastination tendencies” (Lee, 2005, p12)
  • “High procrastinators were more likely to be concerned with what others may have been thinking of them, how they were presenting themselves, and about their performance during the learning process” (Lee, 2005, p13). To achieve perfectness, they procrastinate.
  1. “There is a strong body of evidence that lower levels of self-regulating behaviours are related to higher levels of procrastination” (Krauchuk & Rahani, 2007, p917)

 

  1. Effects
  2. Grunschel, Patrzek & Fries (2013): sleep-related problems, lengthened study course and a restricted future perspective are the potential severity of academic procrastination.
  3. By procrastinating, students cloud the causal factors involved in poor performance to lack of effort rather than to low ability (Lee, 2005).

 

  1. Thesis Statement: This paper will present solutions in reducing procrastination among students.

 

  1. BODY
  2. Educators (lecturers and teachers) play a huge role in helping to solve students’ procrastination.
  3. Provide explicit instruction and deadline for assignments:
    • “Lecturers could pay attention to setting fixed deadlines and to being organized to support students in reducing academic procrastination.” (Grunschel, Patrzek & Fries, 2013, p858)
    • “Instruction in task analysis, time estimation, time planning and other study skills could help someone overcome excessive dependence on others for structure” (Day, Mensink, O’Sullivan, 2000, p132)
    • “If students were not confused about what was expected or what they needed to do in order to succeed, they were more motivated to get started.” (Faculty Focus)

 

 

  1. “Teachers should be sensitive to the balance between students ’skills and the challenges of the task.” (Lee, 2005, p13)
    • “Teachers need to help students to have clear goals in their work, to concentrate on the task at hand, and to not be excessively self-conscious in learning.” (Lee, 2005, p13)
    • “Use real and realistic projects, assignments that develop practical professional skills” (Ackerman, D. S. and Gross, B. L.,2005,p8 as cited in Faculty Focus)
    • “Interdependence — Breaking large assignments down into interdependent parts and requiring completion of those parts got students working on larger assignments earlier and kept them working more consistently.” (Faculty Focus)

 

  • Teachers should choose tasks should have personal relevance to students
    • Rewards and incentives: Studies found that students get started earlier when there were rewards and incentives for doing so, which include points, or even encouraging written comments from teachers on work in progress. (Faculty Focus)

 

 

  1. Strategies student counsellors can use to help preventing procrastination among students.
  2. If students lack study and organizational skills as reasons for academic procrastination, student counsellors could generate working steps for academic tasks with students. (Grunschel, Patrzek & Fries, 2013, p858)
  3. Counsellors could coach students on time management and goal setting techniques. (Grunschel, Patrzek & Fries, 2013, p858)
  • To improve students’ self-regulation, student counsellors could convey strategies to enhance self-motivation and to encounter distractions (Grunschel, Patrzek & Fries, 2013, p858)

 

  1. Procrastinator can also get help from peers around them.
  2. Students could develop a peer feedback system with their friends. When students first receive help from their peers, they reduce the need to rely on lecturers (Grunschel, Patrzek & Fries, 2013)
  3. Make Someone else manage your to-do list (Gelman, n.d., Reader Digest)
  4. Some individual approach can be done in reducing procrastination.
  5. Improve mind-set:
  • It gives an internal support system that could set aside hopelessness and other form of negative thinking (Lively,1999).
  • Treat every success positively as repeated successful experience demonstrates the benefits of the successful strategy use (Krauchuk & Rahani, 2007)

 

  1. Set Priorities and make schedules on all tasks that need to be done (Lively,1999)
  • Do task analysis into task components (small sequential steps) and practice goal-setting – very useful when discouragement is related to task difficulty (Day, Mensink, O’Sullivan, 2000, p132)
  • Observe active external structuring (such as in following a daily routine or maintaining a journal of prioritized tasks) (Johnson & Bloom, 1994, p132)
  • “Metacognitive strategy training may assist students in knowing what to do and how to do it” (Krauchuk & Rahani, 2007, p928)
  • “Learn concrete strategies for structuring time and developing techniques for maintaining on-task behavior.” (Johnson & Bloom, 1994, p132)

 

  1. CONCLUSION
  2. It is difficult to completely cure procrastination
  3. As “Procrastination is a very human quality” (Lively,1999,p3)

 

  1. Nonetheless, with motivation and guide that are received from educators, counsellors and peers including some individual approaches that are used, procrastination can be greatly reduced.
  2. As procrastination is generally a “motivational problems” or “lack of motivation” (Ferrari, Johnson & McCown, 1995,p82)

 

 

 

ANALYSIS FOR MARKING (BASED ON RUBRIC):

Language:

The outline has mostly citations from texts that students refer to with some students’ own sentences – perhaps only 1.5 mark?

Content:

Contents are sufficient and precise enough and support the topic

Contains sufficient specific citations and quotation relevant to the topic – perhaps only 4.5 marks?

Thesis statement:

Given, and is consistent with the topic of paper, but a bit too simplistic – perhaps 1.5 marks or 2?

Format:

Headers and hierarchy of information is clearly shown

The 3 sections are clearly shown – so perhaps 1 mark

 

So the total that the above outline should receive: 1.5 + 4.5 + 1.5 (or2) + 1 = 8 ½ (or 9)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ULAB 2122:  RUBRIC FOR TERM PAPER OUTLINE [10%]

Language

[2 marks]

 

EXCELLENT (2MARKS) GOOD (1.5MARKS) FUNCTIONAL (1MARK) POOR (0.5MARK)
·    Varied sentence structure, types and length

·    Excellent, varied and suitable choice of vocabulary

·    Almost entirely free of spelling, punctuation and grammatical errors.

·     Lacks variety of sentence structure, types and length

·     Appropriate choice of vocabulary

·     Contains few errors in spelling, punctuation and grammatical items.

·     Limited variety of sentence structure, types and length

·     Limited or inappropriate choice of vocabulary

·     Contains numerous errors  in spelling, punctuation and grammatical items that at times make reading difficult

·     Very limited variety of sentence structure, types and length

·     Use inappropriate or incorrect   vocabulary

·     Contains frequent errors  in spelling, punctuation and grammatical that impede meaning

Contents  [5 marks]

 

EXCELLENT (4.5-5MARKS) GOOD (3.5-4MARKS) FUNCTIONAL (2.5-3MARKS) POOR (0.5-2MARKS)
·    Contains very precise, detailed and sufficient information that is essential to the topic

·    Contents are not overlapping – each main topic addresses one distinct idea

·    Contents are coherent – subtopics clearly relate to the corresponding major topic

·    Contains sufficient specific citations which are attributed to sources with proper APA or similar parenthetical documentation

 

·    Contains sufficient  information that is essential to the topic but not precise and detailed enough

·    Contents are sometimes overlapping – some main topics may address similar  ideas

·    Contents are mostly coherent – some subtopics may not relate to the corresponding major topics

·    Contains specific citations which are attributed to sources but may not be sufficient, and occasionally have problems with APA or similar parenthetical documentation

·    Lacks precise and detailed information that is essential to the topic

·    Contents are usually overlapping – many of the main topics address similar  ideas

·    Contents are often  incoherent – many subtopics may not relate to the corresponding major topics

·    Lacks specific citations which are attributed to sources and  proper APA or similar parenthetical documentation is with many errors

·    Lacks or contains minimal information that is essential to the topic

·    Contents are always overlapping and redundant

·    Contents are not linked – subtopics do not support to the corresponding major topics

·    Lacks or contains no citations and quotations which are attributed to sources and if applicable proper APA or similar parenthetical documentation is with  many errors

Thesis  

[2 marks]

EXCELLENT (2 MARKS) GOOD (1.5 MARKS) FUNCTIONAL (1 MARK) POOR (0.5MARK)
·    Thesis clearly states the problem and the possible solutions [ for problem solution paper]

or

·    Thesis clearly shows the writer’s stance and proposes an arguable point which readers could reasonably agree or disagree [for argumentative paper]

·    Thesis clearly states the problem but the possible solutions are not / Thesis   clearly states the possible solutions but not the problem  [ for problem solution paper]

or

·    Thesis proposes an arguable point which readers could reasonably agree or disagree but does not clearly show  the writer’s stance [for argumentative paper]

·     Thesis does not clearly state  the problem and the possible solutions [ for problem solution paper]

or

·     Thesis does not clearly shows the writer’s stance as well as the  arguable point which readers could reasonably agree or disagree [for argumentative paper]

·    Thesis does not  state the problem and the possible solutions [ for problem solution paper]

or

·    Thesis does not show  the writer’s stance and does not propose an arguable point which readers could reasonably agree or disagree [for argumentative paper]

Format [1 mark] GOOD – EXCELLENT [1 MARK] FUNCTIONAL – POOR [0.5 MARK]
·    Contains headings that are clear and informative

·    Shows clearly the thesis and the 3 sections i.e.  Introduction, body and conclusion

·    Shows clearly the hierarchy of information

 

·    Contains headings that are not very clear nor informative

·    The thesis and the 3 sections i.e.  Introduction, body and conclusion are somewhat clear

·    Hierarchy of information is somewhat clear

 

OVERALL: EXCELLENT: 9.5 – 10 GOOD: 7.5 – 8 FUNCTIONAL: 5 – 5.5 marks POOR: 2 – 3.5 marks

 

 

 

OUTLINE SAMPLE 2

SAMPLE OUTLINE 2:

NUTRITIOUS FOODS DO NOT GUARANTEE OUR HEALTH AND WELL BEING

 

  1. Intro

1.1 Opener: Background on health & wellness awareness

1.2 Thesis statement: Misconception: Nutritious foods are all it takes to be healthy & live well

1.3 Definitions

1.3.1 Nutritious foods: foods that has been consumed by any organism in order to obtain proper nutrition in their life to sustain healthy lifestyle and wellbeing.

1.3.2 Nutrition: the act or process of nourishing.

1.3.3 Health: the condition of being sound in body, mind and spirit, especially for freedom from physical disease or pain

1.3.4 Wellbeing: the state of being happy, healthy and successful.

 

  1. The importance of macronutrients for our body

2.1. Proteins: repair, maintain, and develop body tissues

2.2. Carbohydrates: produce energy

2.3 Fats: insulate body, stabilize temperature against extreme hot and cold

 

  1. Nutritious foods alone doesn’t guarantee optimum health and wellbeing

3.1. Food quantity

3.1.1. too much protein can damage the kidney, but too little protein can hinder recovery or progress

3.1.2 too much cards lead to overweight/obesity/ chronic disease, too little fat hinders body immunity

 

3.2. Food combination (taken at the same time during a meal/snack)

3.2.1. protein + fat = good for fat loss/cutting

3.2.2. protein + carbs = good for muscle mass/bulking and post-workout

3.2.3. carbs + fat = not good for health, leads to overweight/obesity / chronic disease

 

3.3. Food preparation

3.3.1. butter: 177C

3.3.2 extra virgin olive oil: 160 C

3.3.3. coconut oil: 177 C

3.3.4. deep fry using anything: unnecessary extra bad fat

 

3.4. Meal timing

3.4.1. take a meal each time you feel a little hungry, don’t let your body starve

3.4.2 big meal after workout & after bed

3.4.2. small snack before bed & before workout

 

3.5. Meal frequency

3.5.1. for body maintenance: 3 bigger meals a day

3.5.2. for fitness development: 4-6 smaller meals a day

 

3.6. Physical activity

3.6.1. health/fitness maintenance: any exercise, 3 times a week, 10-20 minutes per session

3.6.2. fat loss/cutting: compound strength exercises + cardio/HIIT, 3-5 times a week, 30-120 minutes per session

3.6.3. muscle building/bulking: compound + isolation strength exercises, 4-6 times a week, 60-120 minutes per session

3.6.4. specific sports/skills: tailor-made training

 

3.7. Rest & recovery

3.7.1. 4-8 hours a day

3.7.2. more active lifestyle = more sleep and rest needed

3.7.3. it’s best to sleep early & wake up early

3.7.4. afternoon nap = energy + productivity boost

 

  1. conclusion

4.1. Summary

4.2 Re-statement

 

ANALYSIS FOR MARKING (BASED ON RUBRIC):

Language:

The paper was written in phrasal form – very minimal exhibition of students’ ability in sentence construction – perhaps only 1.5 mark?

Content:

Contents seem sufficient but they also seem incoherent to the topic / or may be unclear because of the way the contents are presented/

Has no citations and quotation – perhaps only 2.5 marks?

Thesis statement:

Given, but a bit inconsistent to the topic – perhaps 1.0marks?

Format:

Headers and hierarchy of information is shown

The 3 sections are clearly shown (but conclusion has no content) – so perhaps 1 mark

 

So the total that the above outline should receive: 1.5 + 2.5 + 1.0 + 1.0 = 6

 

 

ULAB 2122:  RUBRIC FOR TERM PAPER OUTLINE [10%]

Language

[2 marks]

 

EXCELLENT (2MARKS) GOOD (1.5MARKS) FUNCTIONAL (1MARK) POOR (0.5MARK)
·    Varied sentence structure, types and length

·    Excellent, varied and suitable choice of vocabulary

·    Almost entirely free of spelling, punctuation and grammatical errors.

·     Lacks variety of sentence structure, types and length

·     Appropriate choice of vocabulary

·     Contains few errors in spelling, punctuation and grammatical items.

·     Limited variety of sentence structure, types and length

·     Limited or inappropriate choice of vocabulary

·     Contains numerous errors  in spelling, punctuation and grammatical items that at times make reading difficult

·     Very limited variety of sentence structure, types and length

·     Use inappropriate or incorrect   vocabulary

·     Contains frequent errors  in spelling, punctuation and grammatical that impede meaning

Contents  [5 marks]

 

EXCELLENT (4.5-5MARKS) GOOD (3.5-4MARKS) FUNCTIONAL (2.5-3MARKS) POOR (0.5-2MARKS)
·    Contains very precise, detailed and sufficient information that is essential to the topic

·    Contents are not overlapping – each main topic addresses one distinct idea

·    Contents are coherent – subtopics clearly relate to the corresponding major topic

·    Contains sufficient specific citations which are attributed to sources with proper APA or similar parenthetical documentation

 

·    Contains sufficient  information that is essential to the topic but not precise and detailed enough

·    Contents are sometimes overlapping – some main topics may address similar  ideas

·    Contents are mostly coherent – some subtopics may not relate to the corresponding major topics

·    Contains specific citations which are attributed to sources but may not be sufficient, and occasionally have problems with APA or similar parenthetical documentation

·    Lacks precise and detailed information that is essential to the topic

·    Contents are usually overlapping – many of the main topics address similar  ideas

·    Contents are often  incoherent – many subtopics may not relate to the corresponding major topics

·    Lacks specific citations which are attributed to sources and  proper APA or similar parenthetical documentation is with many errors

·    Lacks or contains minimal information that is essential to the topic

·    Contents are always overlapping and redundant

·    Contents are not linked – subtopics do not support to the corresponding major topics

·    Lacks or contains no citations and quotations which are attributed to sources and if applicable proper APA or similar parenthetical documentation is with  many errors

Thesis  

[2 marks]

EXCELLENT (2 MARKS) GOOD (1.5 MARKS) FUNCTIONAL (1 MARK) POOR (0.5MARK)
·    Thesis clearly states the problem and the possible solutions [ for problem solution paper]

or

·    Thesis clearly shows the writer’s stance and proposes an arguable point which readers could reasonably agree or disagree [for argumentative paper]

·    Thesis clearly states the problem but the possible solutions are not / Thesis   clearly states the possible solutions but not the problem  [ for problem solution paper]

or

·    Thesis proposes an arguable point which readers could reasonably agree or disagree but does not clearly show  the writer’s stance [for argumentative paper]

·     Thesis does not clearly state  the problem and the possible solutions [ for problem solution paper]

or

·     Thesis does not clearly shows the writer’s stance as well as the  arguable point which readers could reasonably agree or disagree [for argumentative paper]

·    Thesis does not  state the problem and the possible solutions [ for problem solution paper]

or

·    Thesis does not show  the writer’s stance and does not propose an arguable point which readers could reasonably agree or disagree [for argumentative paper]

Format [1 mark] GOOD – EXCELLENT [1 MARK]   FUNCTIONAL – POOR [0.5 MARK]  
·    Contains headings that are clear and informative

·    Shows clearly the thesis and the 3 sections i.e.  Introduction, body and conclusion

·    Shows clearly the hierarchy of information

 

  ·    Contains headings that are not very clear nor informative

·    The thesis and the 3 sections i.e.  Introduction, body and conclusion are somewhat clear

·    Hierarchy of information is somewhat clear

 

 
OVERALL: EXCELLENT: 9.5 – 10 GOOD: 7.5 – 8 FUNCTIONAL: 5 – 5.5 marks POOR: 2 – 3.5 marks

 

 

OUTLINE SAMPLE 1

SAMPLE OUTLINE 1:

FINANCIAL PLANNING: TOWARDS A BETTER LIFE

 

+Personal Finance: Why people don’t like plan?

++ Lack of financial wisdom

++ Lack of financial discipline

++ Lack of awareness

++ No priority in life

+ The Importance of Personal Financial Planning

++ More certainty

++ More freedom

++ More significance

++ More love and connection

++ More development

++ More contribution to others

+ Common mistakes in Money management

++ No financial goals

++ Lack of motivation

++ Little to no exposure to financial wisdom

++ Little to no planning

++ Little to no action

++ Little to no consistency

+ The effects of poor money management

++ Anxiety

++ Limited options in life

++ Disrespect

++ Unhealthy relationship

++ No progress

++ No giving back to others

+ What needs to be done

++ Start setting goals

++ Start understanding the situation

++ Start planning

++ Start taking action

++ Start self-reflecting

++Start keeping momentum

 

 

ANALYSIS FOR MARKING (BASED ON RUBRIC):

Language:

The paper was written in point form only – very minimal exhibition of students’ ability in sentence construction – perhaps only 1 mark?

Content:

Contains minimal information / contains no citations and quotation – perhaps only 2 marks?

Thesis statement:

Not given so 0 mark

Format:

Headers and hierarchy of information somewhat clear

The 3 sections are not clearly shown – so perhaps ½ mark

 

So the total that the above outline should receive: 1 + 2 + 0 + ½ = 3 ½

 

 

WORD OF THE DAY: equipoise

equipoise
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share on Google+
\EE-kwuh-poiz, EK-wuh-\
noun
1. an equal distribution of weight; even balance; equilibrium.
2. a counterpoise.
Quotes
We’re neither better nor worse than each other, we’re an equipoise in difference–but in difference, mind, not in sameness.
— D. H. Lawrence, “Education of the People,” Reflections on the Death of a Porcupine and Other Essays, 1925

WORD OF THE DAY: savoir-faire

savoir-faire
\SAV-wahr-FAIR\
noun
1. knowledge of just what to do in any situation; tact.
Quotes
Son of a clerk and grandson of peasants, Ryszard was keenly aware how much deportment and savoir faire figure in the impression one makes on others, and was not about to relax his standards for himself because he had read (all travelers were in agreement about this) that fine manners counted for little in the New World.
— Susan Sontag, In America, 2000

WORD OF THE DAY: Syncretism

syncretism Audio Pronunciation
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share on Google+
\SING-kri-tiz-uh m, SIN-\
noun
1. the attempted reconciliation or union of different or opposing principles, practices, or parties, as in philosophy or religion.
2. Grammar. the merging, as by historical change in a language, of two or more categories in a specified environment into one, as, in nonstandard English, the use of waswith both singular and plural subjects, while in standard English was is used with singular subjects (except for you in the second person singular) and were with plural subjects.